October 15, 2013

Colonel Rob Savage

I'm kind of mad as I write this. Mad that I don't have the cash reserve to buy a copy of this book for every single hero-girl here and mad that a book with a hero THIS good as of the writing of this feature still has just five Amazon reviews and one belongs to me. The only thing making this better is getting to feature Rob and doing my part to fix this literary diamond in the rough atrocity. Check that--it's not even in the rough. It's more like this is a ten-carat Harry Winston of a hero and he's tucked away in a velvet bag in a rarely used desk drawer because there isn't thousands of marketing dollars behind him. Ladies, Rob is what FHF is about. He owned me completely after about three chapters. As he is distilled and concentrated wounded-hero elixir, I had to keep reading to be sure he would appeal to the hero-girls on all levels and was a true orange-head hero, but that wasn't a hardship at all, hehe, and he absolutely is. In every way.


About Broken Wings (released Sept. 1, 2013):

He lives to fly—until a jagged piece of flack changes his life forever.

A tragic childhood has turned American Air Forces Colonel Rob Savage into an outwardly indifferent loner who is afraid to give his heart to anyone. RAF nurse Maggie McGrath has always dreamed of falling in love and settling down in a thatched cottage to raise a croftful of bairns, but the war has taken her far from Innisbraw, her tiny Scot’s island home.

Hitler’s bloody quest to conquer Europe seems far away when Rob and Maggie are sent to an infirmary on Innisbraw to begin his rehabilitation from disabling injuries. Yet they find themselves caught in a battle between Rob’s past, God’s plan, and the evil some islanders harbor in their souls. Which will triumph?

Excerpt from Broken Wings:


          What was tattie bree--and Lucozade? He'd heard somewhere that the Scots ate weird things, like oatmeal and liver stuffed into a sheep's stomach and everything that came from the sea, even slimy creatures without scales or fins. "Maggie, use English," he said more gruffly than intended. "I get so frustrated when I can't understand you."
          "I'm trying my verra best no' to frustrate you, Colonel." Her sharp tone got his attention. She was so beautiful with her chin raised and her large, dark blue eyes sparking with indignation.
          "So it's 'Colonel' now, is it? I must have put a burr under your saddle."
          "Rob!"
          He was sure she hadn't understood the American idiom, but it had surprised her out of her snit. He couldn't suppress a grin. "That's better. I don't like it when you're mad at me, bonnie Maggie."
          She rolled her eyes. "For your information, tattie bree is a thick potato broth. They make it in the kitchen and it's verra guid. And Locozade is a nourishing drink made with glucose syrup. You'll find it all over Scotland, no' just in infirmaries."
          "Why didn't you say so in the first place?"
          "Because I'm back in Scotland now and I keep forgetting you don't understand Scots."
          He reached for her hand, needing the comfort of her touch. "Did anyone ever tell you your eyes turn dark blue when you're angry?"
          "Och, you're skiting--fooling--with me."
          "I mean it. Right now, they're sort of violet blue, but when your dander's up, they turn almost navy." He squeezed her hand. "Let your hair down, please. I've been trying to imagine all that black hair spilling around your shoulders and down your back."
          She drew back with a gasp. "I cannot. It's against Regulations."
          "Forget the Regs--just this once."
          "Absolutely no'."
          "I'm talking too much and that's a first. People usually accuse me of being a real bore."
          "You don't like to talk?"
          He wanted to tell her the truth--that until he'd met her he had never been able to talk to a young woman without mangling his words until he was so embarrassed he stopped talking completely--but he never shared his past with anyone. "Not idle chatter."
          "I hadn't noticed."
          "I guess I've never been around someone I wanted to pass the time with. Please bring me some of that 'guid' tattie bree before I starve to death."
          She returned with a tray minutes later.
          He ate a large bowl of the thick broth and choked down a bottle of Lucozade, squirming when the pain in his back began to escalate. He didn't want to ask for APCs this early. "I know you have things to do, but could you tell the Selkie story again?" he asked as she straightened his covers.
          "The Selkie again?"
          "I want to hear it when I'm not full of morphine." His thoughts did not stop there. And I want to hear your soft voice that takes away the pain and fear.
          "We shouldn't spend that much time. I need to bathe and shave you."
          "The crofter returned to the cave with food and water," he prompted.
          "You've remembered. Verra guid."
          He stifled a groan and tried to smile. "What happened next? I need to find out if she stayed on the island."
          "Och, all right, but we don't have time for the ending now--'tis too important to hurry through." She pulled up a chair and sat beside him, accepting the hand he held out.
          The story wove on and on as the two evaded the fishermen by hiding in caves or abandoned cottages, huddling together for warmth, eating what little the crofter could find in the fields. "It didn't take long for the crofter to fall in love with this bonnie lass with her rosy cheeks and lips and her silken, white skin. Of course, he couldn't believe she was really a Selkie, you understand." She continued by relating how the crofter's gentle, tender nature slowly won the trust of the Selkie. "After a week, she no longer waded out into the sea when the strange, haunting voice of her Selkie-lover crested the waves with the dying sun." Maggie laid his hand on the bed and leaped up. "Now, 'tis bathing time."
          "You can't stop now."
          "I can and will."
###
          Rob awakened in the middle of the night, chest heaving, body covered with sweat. What a dreadful nightmare. He wiped his face on a corner of the sheet, trying to recall what he had dreamed. He could only remember a grinding, tearing, screeching sound, flashing lights and then--nothing.
          So he hadn't made it over the security fence, after all. No wonder he has so many aches and bruises. If he could have used the rudders, he might not have lost so much altitude before he reached the base.
          Used the rudders.
          He tucked his hand beneath the covers and moved it down to his thigh. He pinched the flesh. Nothing. No pain, absolutely nothing. His breath caught in a ragged sob. The surgery hadn't worked after all.
          If only he hadn't been so set on using a single bomber. If only Wells had refused to allow it. If only...

Excerpt used with permission. All rights reserved.


Gallant Score

The world needs more men like Rob. So I'll look past him stealing a kiss from Maggie with the prowess of Ty Cobb stealing a base. Because when her father walks in on said stolen kiss, their man-to-man conversation afterward was pure orange-head material. But even way before that, the way Rob chose to handle what he knew was a poorly planned mission and couldn't rest until he knew the fate of his men that has been with him on his B-17 that went down. Brave. Honorable. Trustworthy (in spite of the nasty rumors that get started about him and Maggie by a very disturbed and vengeful woman). Rob's crippling injury actually only brings this side of him out even more, though in different ways than when he was commanding the 396th and flying.


Wounded Score

Confession. I have no idea how someone as wounded (physically and emotionally) as Rob pulls off such an off the chart gallantry score and a softie score this high. But he does. Believably, naturally, and in his unique Rob way that's humor and redirects to mask and avoid some very deep scars on his heart. I really, really want to tell you what they are but it would diminish your reader experience. Therefore you just have to wait for Rob to finally, finally open up to you in the pages of Broken Wings. Well, to Maggie, but you know what I mean. Rob endured a heart-breaking childhood, which contributed to him being about as socially awkward with women as you can imagine as an adult, and that's BEFORE that jagged piece of metal flays his back open and takes away the last thing left that he loves--flying. =/


Softie Score

You'll see this very early in that dance he shares with Maggie. Then in the undercurrent of his personality even when he's cranky. That moment on the beach during the rescue when he takes care of the little baby? Total heart melt moment. I've never encountered such a strong hero with such a deep softie side. It was incredibly refreshing and so much part of what makes Rob the man he is.


Stupid Strikes

None to report. Rob does a few things throughout the book that really make me cringe, but nothing I would pop him here for.

Swoon Score

Yep. Everything about him. Hero serving his country, his crazy sense of humor, the whole tall, dark and handsome package, a childhood that will pull your heartstrings hard (the scars on his heart and the reason he's so reserved go way back), a DNA-deep need to protect people, never backing down, and a mind that never shuts off. I loved everything about Rob and fell for him fast and hard. Any hero girl will. Which is why he's here.

Dianne Price fell in love with writing at the age of five. Because her father was a barnstorming pilot, she was bitten early by the “flying bug” as well. She attended the University of California, Santa Barbara and met and married the man God had prepared for her—an aeronautical engineer. After their five children were in school, she burned the midnight oil and wrote three novels, all published by Zebra Press. When her husband died only three years after he retired, she felt drawn to visit the Outer Hebrides Isles of Scotland, where her husband’s clan (MacDonalds) and her own clan (Galbraiths) originated. Many yearly trips, gallons of tea, too little sleep, and a burst of insight birthed her Thistle Series.

PUBLISHER’S NOTE: Dianne, born August 1933, lived joyfully despite dealing with terminal cancer and died in August 2013, a mere week before the release date for the first book of this series, Broken Wings. Everyone involved with the production of this book and the next five has been blessed beyond measure to have known Dianne and be a part of giving readers a chance to meet Rob and Maggie and visit the beautiful, fictional isle of Innisbraw. Leave a message for her family and sign up to hear the latest about her books at Dianne's publishing page or "Like" her Facebook page. Also, sign up for the Ashberry Lane newsletter to always know the latest about Dianne's releases.


The FHF Exclusive Directly from the Author

Dianne actually wrote an extra scene to have on her website as a teaser. It's no longer up, but Ashberry Lane has made it available to us here at FHF for our hero-girls. Thank you to the Price family, and to Ashberry Lane for this extra look at Rob and Maggie. Trust me, as you read this book from the beginning, you get used to the Scotts, and literally almost learn another language. It's part of what I enjoyed so much about the story.


Maggie dug through a poke of tatties, nattering to herself. “He’s cold and hard, that’s what he is. What kind of man won’t talk about his own mither?” She tossed two tatties, a neep, carrot, and onion, onto the bunker—enough for a large pot of tattie and mince bree. She grabbed a paring knife and attacked the onion.
Five years she’d been away from her beloved green island—from her family, her friends, the sweet smell of heather spilling doon the slopes of Ben Innis, the sound of the sea sooking on the shore. Nursing school had seemed like an eternity, but then came the war and her commission in the RAF Nurses Corps. After three years of hopping between RAF hospitals, she’d leapt eagerly at the chance to serve on an American airbase, to hone her skills and learn new ones.
Why had he spoiled her homecoming?
She had thought Rob was getting better about talking. He’d only grunted once on that dreadful trawler ride from Oban to the Isle of Innisbraw, and then ’twas because she’d—och, she’d asked about his family.
Tears stung her eyes. It had to be the onion.
No grunt from him this mornin. Only a ragged, “Don’t talk about that.”
She chopped the vegetables, knife and tears flying.
She’d told him about her mither’s dying when birthing her brother, Calum. It only seemed fit to ask about his mither. Wasn’t that what friends did? Och, she was his nurse, his therapist, aye, but they’d been through so much together since his B-17 crash-landed on the airbase runway.
Had his family abused him? Or his mother—had she abandoned him? The thought stabbed at her heart, bringing a gasp.
After filling a large kettle with water, she scooped in the vegetables, added minced beef, seasonings, and Oxo bullion cubes, and set it on the hot peat stove to simmer. What a fine pair they were—him holding tight to his emotions and her crying a burn when happy, sad, ... or angry.
A bit of scripture blazed across her mind: You must make allowances for each other’s faults and forgive the person who offends you. Remember, the Lord forgave you, so you must forgive others.
Remorse tore at her soul. How had she allowed herself to forget all she had learned from God’s Word? She wasn’t tied to a bed or wheelchair, didn’t writhe from pain. She could walk ootside and feel the sun on her face, taste the salt on an inshore breeze.
Maggie checked her watch. Forty-five minutes ’til the bree was done. Enough time to bring him comfort—to lace her fingers through Rob’s and assure him she’d no’ ask about his past again.

The giveaways

A copy of Broken Wings, print or e-book, winners choice, to a randomly drawn commenter. Tell me what intrigues you most about Rob and that you'd like in the book drawing. Very important- leave us your email in a way we can contact you if you win, in a spam fighting format like
flyboy (at) Innisbraw dot com =)

If you've already gotten your hands on this novel and already devoured it, PROPS TO YOU. Let's do a drawing for the $10 Amazon or Barnes & Noble gift card but you have to leave me the name of a character that isn't Rob or Maggie. Same rules as usual. Once that character is used, you need another. We need your e-mail to reach you if you win so be sure you leave it or have it linked in your profile.

Drawings will be on Halloween! (10.31.2013)

WWII month is wrapping up here at FHF so let's talk war heroes. How exactly would you define a war hero? I have my criteria but I want to know yours. Let's play!

37 comments:

Abbi Hart said...

This book sounds really good! I'm a sucker for a good WWII story and with your glowing recommendation I'm sure I'll love it! It's so sad that the author died before her book was published! Thanks for the chance to win this!
As for war hero criteria...hmm...I'd say someone who doesn't let the war change who they are at their core, who stands firm in their beliefs. Someone who hates that they have to fight and kill but is willing to stand up and protect their country anyway. Someone who doesn't view their military accomplishments as something to be proud about or praised for but rather feels like they were just doing their duty and mourns the lives lost. Someone who isn't arrogant or thinks they are better than those of a lesser rank but instead treats everyone as equals giving them the respect they are due as God's creations. Someone who is willing to admit when they are wrong and is teachable. And lastly someone who recognizes those in authority over them but ultimately does what God wants rather than man. That's just what came to my head when I read your question!

Clari Dees said...

Wow! I'm hooked! Don't put me in the drawing because I'm going to Amazon from here to download it to my Kindle. I just finished Dee Henderson's latest release and couldn't figure out what to pick up next. Thanks to this post... problem solved! :-) This hero-loving reader thanks you for rectifying the oversight of not knowing about this book!

As to defining a war hero... I don't know that I can put it into words any better than to say... Audie Murphy.

Nancy Kimball said...

Thanks, Abbi. As an author I can see the issues that bigger publishers might have had with it, but for me they were part of what made the story so great. I too am saddened I didn't have an opportunity to tell Dianne herself how very special this book and this hero were to me, but happy that her dream is continuing on in her work. I am SO ready for book 2!!! Loved your definition of a hero and wholeheartedly agree. =) We've got you in the book drawing!

Nancy Kimball said...

Oh I LOVE it when that happens! =) YES! Then come back and tell us how much you loved Rob. I'm about to let my slip show here, but I don't know who Audie Murphy is. School me, Clari. =)

Heidi said...

I'm sold! When you said he is a softie even when cranky is awesome. Can't wait to read this one :) Thanks for sharing the review!

colorvibrant[at]gmail[dot]com

Nancy Kimball said...

It's pretty amazing to see. The quickest way to bring down a really strong man is make him dependent on others. This is a must-read for any historical romance readers. For those who can sample in other genres like me, they'll still enjoy him for sure though. Always great to see you, Heidi and we'll get you in the book drawing.

Clari Dees said...

:-)
Audie Murphy, a Texas boy, was one of the most famous and decorated soldiers of WWII--ultimately winning the Medal of Honor while only 20 years old. After the war, he became an actor (I love his westerns) and portrayed himself in the movieTo Hell and Back which shows how he won the Medal of Honor. (If you like war movies, I highly recommend this one.) I also recommend Ride A Crooked Trail as a good western of his to start with. :-)

Audie Murphy

Nancy Kimball said...

You get an extra serving of "you're awesome", Clari. Thank you! I will have to get these movies for when I need to rest from the keyboard and the kindle. Thank you!!!

Britney Adams said...

Rob Savage sounds like a very special man and I can't wait to meet him! I love the line in the synopsis where it says, "Rob and Maggie find themselves caught in a battle between Rob’s past, God’s plan, and the evil some islanders harbor in their souls." Sounds like a must-read for sure! Please enter my name in the book drawing. Thank you so much!

I hope Dianne's legacy, through this book series, touches the lives of many!

texaggs2000 at gmail dot com

Nancy Kimball said...

It's a must-read, Britney. =) We'll get you in the drawing and I agree with you about Dianne's literary legacy. Well said.

KayM said...

Please enter me in the drawing. Rob sounds like a wonderful hero. I loved the conversation between him and Maggie. I hadn't planned to read this series. I thought it would be too sad with her gone, but I've changed my mind. I think I can do it as a tribute to her.
may_dayzee(at)yahoo(dot)com

Christina Tarabochia said...

Nancy, being the Publisher of this amazing book, you know how much I love Rob already, but you did something amazing. See, I've lived with him for four years now--I was Dianne's editor well before getting into the publishing side--and sometimes a girl can forget what a good man she has. You've opened my eyes to the precious man he is--the real definition of precious, as in extremely hard to find. And you've made me head-over-heels in love with him again!

Thank you for your glowing recommendation! I will hear your voice urging me on as we finish up Book Two, A Wing and a Prayer.

Nancy Kimball said...

He is a stunning hero. I did too! Choosing the excerpt for a feature is both the best and hardest part but that slice of story gave you a deep glimpse into these two and how they interact with one another. Happy to know you'll be diving into the Thistle series after all, Kay and always great to see you. We'll get you in the book drawing. =)

Nancy Kimball said...

Christina, thank you. I understand how that happens as I'm an author as well. Rob is exactly what an orange-head hero should be and I'm grateful to be able to share his and Maggie's story with more readers. Every book I've ever featured reminds me how close I could have been to missing out on their stories because there are so many books out there I couldn't possibly read all the gems even if I knew exactly which ones they were. So for the ones I am able to partake of, I thank God and then do my part to pass that on. We anxiously await A Wing and a Prayer. =)

Nicole M. Miller said...

"flyboy (at) Innisbraw dot com =)"

Oh this might be my new favorite blog of all time. ;-)

Thanks for this excellent overview of Rob, Nancy! I worked with Christina (publisher) and Dianne before she passed designing the cover and I'm in love with that character too!

(PS - No need to enter me into the drawing - I've got some copies! ;-) )

Nicole - millermediasolutions.com

Gretchen E.K. Engel said...

You know I had to respond. Wounded + pilot + foreign setting = automatic GEKE like. I absolutely loved this story. I'll have to pop up a review on Amazon.
Watching Rob heal and Rob and Maggie's love grow was absolutely beautiful. And the Scots language and culture were an added dimension. It caught me up in it so much I actually bought kippers for lunch when Maggie told Rob he probably wouldn't eat them for breakfast. I would but I'm weird that way.
As for other characters Elspeth. I loved this woman. Dear, dear lady. Nothing like those beloved matriarch saints in our congregations.

Gretchen E.K. Engel said...

Oops. I mean, there is nothing like those beloved matriarch saints in our churches. In other words, we have them today. Get to know them. They are such a blessing!

Pam K. said...

I've read a review or two of Broken Wings but it's your review that makes me want to read this book. What intrigues me about Rob? I want to know how he has such depth of character but yet had a difficult childhood. Somewhere he must have met the Lord, but I'm curious to know the circumstances. I'd like to be entered in the drawing for this book and would love to win a copy! Thanks for the chance and for reviewing Broken Wings.

pmk56[at]sbcglobal[dot]net

Melanie Backus said...

Nancy, Broken Wings sounds like a must read for me. I can't wait to find out more about Rob. With his difficult childhood, I am sure he had to overcome many obstacles. I so wish Dianne could have been able to see how her written words touch so many.

mauback55 at gmail dot com

Stacey said...

Nancy, no need to enter me in the contest. :) I just bought my own copy. I can't wait to meet Rob! :) Your blog rocks!

Nancy Kimball said...

Nicole, welcome to FHF! I love it when people get my e-mail address humor. =) That is a beautiful horse in your profile pic, by the way. The cover of this book is very good and I thought captured Rob and Maggie's personality beautifully. I had asked Christina if Ashberry did a live shoot for it because I had some questions and she was so helpful. We'd be okay with being your new favorite blog of all time, hehe. Be sure to follow by email so you don't miss the new heroes on the 1st and 15th. If you know a great one from a recent release, nominate him with the button. Thanks so much! =)

Nancy Kimball said...

Oh I knew you would be stopping in but I am always happy when you do. =) I so agree with your assessment and remember when you bought the kippers, hehe.
ELSPETH!!! Amen to that and I'm blessed to have several of those women to glean wisdom from. We'll get you in the giftcard drawing and so glad you loved Rob.

Nancy Kimball said...

Pam K, that's one of the nicest things anyone could say to me! Thank you! We'll get you in the book drawing and I won't spoil it for you how Rob knows Christ, and when. You can enjoy it for yourself. =)

Nancy Kimball said...

Thanks, Melanie. He did for sure, and some he still struggles with. He is an incredibly deep and dynamic character while still being straight-forward and uncomplicated for the most part. I've really never encountered a hero quite like him before.
I too wish Dianne could have celebrated this part of her work, but I imagine she's having a much bigger celebration with her previously departed husband and loved ones. I'm just grateful to be able to help share this amazing story and this incredibly amazing man with whoever will listen. This novel is very different and gently colors outside the "lines" of the usual CBA fare but it is a MUST READ for historical romance readers and any reader who loves a great hero. We'll get you in the book drawing.

Nancy Kimball said...

HAHA. You're sweet to tell me and that makes me SO happy. Come back and tell me what you think of Rob. Flip to the middle and find me a character that isn't Elspeth and we'll get you in the gift card drawing. =)

Joy W. Doering said...

We would, indeed! :) Great to have you here, Nicole. And since this is our favorite blog of all time, too, you have come to the right place! Welcome!
Great work on the cover! I am a photographer as well as a writer- so the entire cover shoot process fascinates me. :) I hope to observe one someday. :)

Sherrie Ashcraft said...

Nancy, as the other partner (Christina's mom) of Ashberry Lane, let me just say what a pure delight it was to read this review! I've never seen anything like it!! I love your humor and the way you express yourself, and of course the great things you see in Rob. Years ago, when Christina first started editing Dianne's work, she told me, "Mom, I can hardly wait for you to read this book. You will love it!" But it took until the final editing before I was able to do so. And you know what? She was right! This story drew me in to a fictional place that seemed as real as what I see outside my office window. We are so proud to be able to publish the
Thistle Series for people to enjoy as much as we do. Thanks so much for spreading the word in such a big way!! And no need to enter me in the contest--I know how to get my hands on my own copy, Ha ha!

Nancy Kimball said...

Thanks, Sherrie. Yes, Fiction Hero Features is the first and only blog of its kind, that's for sure. Which is why when God gave me the inspiration for it in response to some earnest "Help!" prayers over the whole platform building thing in my early author days, I was floored no one had figured out how very many hero-girls out there read a book for the hero more than just a good story. Slowly but surely, we're gathering, hehe. =)
I understand exactly what you described and am always so thrilled to find a book of this quality by a small press or independently published. Because it's rare. But I hope that's changing too with more and more presses like Ashberry and DeWard, etc.
Glad to share Rob with the hero girls and help spread the word.
Thanks for making the time to stop by. =)

Joy, my partner here, has a similar sense of humor and style as mine so you'll like her reviews just as much. Sometimes our friends can't always tell us apart at first in our features, hehe.

Angi said...

Nancy, I enjoyed reading the feature about Rob. Despite his injuries, I thought he had a cute sense of humor. But I also felt for him in the scene after he had the nightmare. It just makes you want to give all of our service people a great big hug for all that they do.

Wow, how would I define a war hero? This makes me think of the young man that just this week, received the Medal of Honor for his bravery during battle while trying to help a wounded comrade to a waiting helicopter. As he helped to load the soldier in the chopper, he gave him a quick kiss on the head and then returned to battle to finish helping his men. That's what a hero is to me. Someone who puts others above themselves, even to the point of risking their own life, and then runs back into the battle to help finish the job. It's that comradery that says, 'I'm not better than you. We're in this together'.

Please put me in the drawing for a hard copy. Thanks!
bookwarp@gmail.com

Natalie Monk said...

Thanks for letting us know about this book! I'm hooked and want to read it now. Rob's past and why he won't tell her about his mother is VERY intriguing.

I'd like to be in the drawing for an e-copy of the book!

Joy W. Doering said...

Love your definition of a hero, Angi. Thanks so much for your feedback and we will get you entered in the book drawing. :)

Joy W. Doering said...

Hey Natalie. I think a lot of people are hooked- including me! :) Thanks for the comment and we'll enter you in the drawing for a book.

Martha A. said...

Wow, that sounds like quite the book. If I don't win it, I am going to have to buy it as I love WW2 books and there are not enough good ones.
Something that intrigues me about Rob, would be how he is going to not let his past always dog him, even in future relationships. martha(at)lclink(dot)com

grams said...

I like WW2 books and would love to win a copy. Would like to see how Rob overcomes his past.

Joy W. Doering said...

Always love seeing you here, Martha! :) We'll enter you in the book drawing.

Joy W. Doering said...

Thanks for checking in, grams. :) I'm interested to know how Rob overcomes, too. But I know it's gotta be good- because he's here! :) Your name is in the hat.

Nancy Kimball said...

We have WINNERS!!!

The copy of Broken Wings goes to... drumroll... Natalie Monk!
The $10 Amazon or Barnes & Noble gift card goes to... drumroll... My favorite spec-fic GEKE, Gretchen!

Thank you everyone SO MUCH and keep an eye out for Book 2 on Amazon.
Our newest hero posts in just under three hours and you do NOT want to miss him. He's a total 180 from Rob, but orange for sure.

Thanks to Ashberry Lane and the Price family for sharing Robb with us.

Much love,

Nancy K